Yieldstreet Reviews & Ratings
Type:
Debt
Focus:
Litigation Debt

Overall:

Platform Provided Due Diligence:

Platform Fees:

Quality of Deals:

To see discussions  from over 1000 accredited investors as they share their experience with Yieldstreet, join the 506 Investor Group. Get access and special terms to other legal financing funds.

YieldStreet’s technology connects you to asset-based opportunities presented by best-in-class originators. And it's as easy as buying stocks.

YieldStreet investments are debt based alternative investments. YieldStreet Originators take out a loan for a project or need that is collateralized by an underlying asset the originator has, such as a real estate property or legal settlement.

YieldStreet’s offerings currently concentrate in three primary alternative asset classes: real estate, litigation finance and commercial finance. You can learn more about each of our asset classes on YieldStreet University. YieldStreet seeks investment opportunities that provide individuals with low correlation to the broader stock market, and target annual yields between 8-20%.

As originators make principal and interest payments during the term of their loan, distributions are paid out directly to investors in the offering.

All YieldStreet offerings are asset-based, meaning your investment is backed by strong collateral such as vehicles or real estate. This collateral acts like insurance in the rare case a borrower defaults.

The YieldStreet team does an initial review of the opportunity according to the five criteria set in its Investment Philosophy:

Asset-based with strong collateral

Low market correlation

Established asset managers

Short duration (1-3 years)

Attractive yield (8-20% annual target returns)

YieldStreet At A Glance

Here’s the quick and dirty part of our YieldStreet review, separated into easy-to-read categories so that you can tell, at a glance, whether a YieldStreet investment is good for you or not. As always, you’ll need to do your own due diligence in identifying whether a specific investment offered by YieldStreet is an appropriate choice for you. However, this due diligence starts right here with our review.

 

Minimum Investment Levels: 

Our YieldStreet review can review that the minimum investment for a typical offering is usually around $10,000. However, this isn’t standard but instead an average - minimums can vary by offer. Munimums in the past have been set anywhere between $60,000 at the highest and $5,000 at the lowest; the YieldStreet Prism Fund, for example, begins at $5,000. 

Types of Investments:

Yieldstreet offers a wide variety of investment opportunities. This includes real estate investment, marine finance, art, commercial loans, and litigation All of these investment offerings are featured on the YieldStreet website complete with necessary details including the total size of the offering, the minimum and maximum investment levels, the duration of the investment, and how much annual return is expected, making it easy for prospective investors to do their due diligence. Yieldstreet also goes into detail why the company chose the investment as well as the expenses such as management fees, the risks of these investments, its risk mitigation strategies, and what the time schedule is likely to be for repayment. 

Investments Based on Underlying Assets:  

Every Yieldstreet offering is backed by an underlying asset. This could be real estate for real estate deals, marine vessels for marine finance, or a legal settlement, which gives the company a multitude of ways to potentially recover defaulted loans. Yet there’s still no guarantee that YieldStreet investors will get a return on their investment;all investing involves risk, after all, and this includes the possible loss of your principal investment. LIke the old adage goes, you have to spend money to make money!

Fees:

Yieldstreet Management does charge annual management fees. This management fee is, on average, between 1% to 2.5%. In addition to these fees, Yieldstreet sometimes charges originators listing fees as well. This is all dependent on the type of investment; some carry flat annual fees that begin at $100 to $150 in the short term for the first 12 months and then drop to $30 to $70 for subsequent years. The platform deducts these fees from your initial interest payments, and these fees are clearly delineated on the pages for each individual offering on the platform. 

Accredited Investor Exclusivity:

Like many investment platforms, YieldStreet reserves most of its investment deals for accredited investors only. According to the Securities and Exchange Commission, accredited investors must have at least $1 million in net worth in addition to the value of your primary residence. Alternatively, you must have made at least $200,000 over the past two years (or $300,000 if they’re married). This means that only accredited investor activity is summarily high on this platform

 Some Non-Accredited Investor Support:

While most of the investor activity for YieldStreet is relegated to accredited investors, the platform has launched a new fixed-income portfolio perfect for those with alternative assets. The Prism Fund is open to non-accredited investment, offering five asset classes: corporate preferred bonds, real estate, private business credit, commercial, and legal investment. The offering pays quarterly and has an annual income rate of 7%, according to the company. Annual fees are 1.5% for investors. The liquidation date for the fund is set at March 2024, but fund asset liquidation may take up to an additional 12 months after that for you to receive compensation. 

Self-directed IRA option:  

For anyone looking for investing through self-directed IRA options, YieldStreet has opportunities for you. The company uses IRA Services as a third party custodian broker; investing can be made with a trust or an LLC. If you have a solo 401(k) that’s configured as a trust or LLC, you can use these assets as well.

Investment liquidity:

Committing to YieldStreet means that the platform will manage your investing for the duration of the offering. This can also extend beyond the planned duration when necessary. What this means for an investor is that once you invest your money, you’ve now committed to the full term of the platform’s investment. The one notable difference is that the Prism Fund does allow personal investing to be redeemed in June of 2021. 

 Investment availability: 

Investing through the platform is no guarantee of availability. Each investing opportunity is only available for a limited time, which means one investor may get in under the wire while another may be locked out; investing in very much a first-come, first-served situation. Investment returns are, therefore, measured in years, not months. When it comes to pros and cons, this may be one of the biggest drawbacks if you want to invest in YieldStreet.

The Details

Our Yieldstreet review reveals the inner workings of this opportunity like none other, and for good reason: if you choose to invest in this opportunity, it’s crucial that you understand the differences between this platform and the majority of others on the market. Plenty of crowdfunded real estate platforms let you purchase a share in a commercial real estate. This is, after all, the standard operating procedure for the lion’s share of these types of crowdfunding investment opportunities. Yieldstreet, however, takes a different approach: it’s an alternative investment platform that makes debt investments. In summary, Yieldstreet crowdfunds the debt incurred to finance both real estate investments and other borrower payment dependent investments. This opens up dozens of opportunities that you simply wouldn’t be able to access with a more traditional crowdfunding approach.

Yieldstreet began in 2015 with its first offering, a litigation finance investment that pairs investors with plaintiffs in need of cash to cover expenses prior to the arrival of an expected lawsuit settlement. Since then, YieldStreet has branched out into personal finance, residential property, commercial lending, fine art purchases, and even oil tanker loan purchasing - wherever there’s the possibility for profit, YieldStreet has its eye on it. Investments in these loans provide interest payments and return of principal investment over their lifetime, though investing in such deals do always carry a risk of default if the borrower cannot repay. This is a different type of risk than your typical investment in real estate, for example; while there’s a risk that a property will not turn a profit after sale, an alternative investment that ends up in default can be harder to recover.

Due to the higher level of risk (and commensurate reward) associated with these alternative investments, most YieldStreet deals are reserved for accredited investors with the deep pockets to handle larger investment sizes. However, the company has since launched the Prism Fund in August of 2020, which is specifically open to nonaccredited investors that can meet the $5,000 minimum investment requirement. This helps to democratize access to YieldStreet somewhat, though this $5000 minimum may still be high for novices or others who simply do not have the necessary assets to invest.

At the same time, this hasn’t necessarily slowed down the growth of this unique investment opportunity. In fact, according to our due diligence, the YieldStreet wallet contains more than $1.5 billion in investment activity as of October 2020. The 2020 Inc. 5000, which lists the fastest-growing privately held companies in the US, ranked Yieldstreet as 46th.

Deciding if YieldStreet is Right For You

Our YieldStreet review of its short term investments and long term cons, pros, and other issues, even with advertiser disclosure, must be clear: the company offers individuals the opportunity to invest in things that most individuals usually would not. Investments in private structured credit deals are usually reserved for institutional investors and hedge funds, and are very rarely open for a private individual to invest in. This makes YieldStreet offerings unique and, if you’re looking for opportunities for such investments, an excellent choice indeed.  

However, if your interest lies in more accessible investment opportunities or ones with slightly less risk, YieldStreet might not be the best choice for you. Being ideal for experienced investment means, necessarily, that novice investors are likely to find YieldStreet a poor fit. With the requirement that most investors be accredited save for the single Prism offering, and with a minimum of $5000 on that fund investment, YieldStreet is decidedly not a good bet if you’re looking to simply dip your toes into this type of investment activity. Instead, it’s much more geared towards already successful, well-heeled investor activity. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course - there are simply better choices out there for novices. Once you’ve got your sea legs, YieldStreet has much to offer indeed - and even more so for accredited investment activity.

As always, our Yieldstreet review wouldn’t be complete unless we specified the general dangers of investing. Always conduct due diligence in researching investments and never put all your eggs in one basket and keep the 10% rule of thumb in mind: never invest more than one tenth of your portfolio in the kinds of alternative investments that YieldStreet offers. Instead, keep the majority of your investments on mutual funds or index funds, as these will give you a diversified and broad exposure to the stock market.

Due Diligence & Discussions

Share your experience. Rate and comment!

Skip Friedman

Apr 11, 2021

Run as far away as you can, 2 of 4 Invesrments in total default, and one paying only 33% of promised yield for no apparent reason. The Louisiana Oul & Gas deal was totally misrepresented with a 65 LTV, a future disclosure said they learned a month later that the actual LTV was more like 180 % and they blamed the sponsor. 

Michael Cramer

Apr 10, 2021

I have been lucky not to lose anything so far in the single deal I am participating in. I have turned down others as the bad news about this company and their lack of due diligence continues to appear.

James Hartley

Apr 09, 2021

Absolutely terrible experience with Yieldstreet, out of 8 investments I have 2 defaults, a partial default, and 3 modified outlooks (far worse yields than projected return). Extremely poor due diligence, just slick marketing to capitalize on dollars chasing yield and alternative investments late in the cycle. Steer clear.

Eric Branfman

Apr 09, 2021

Both my deals with Yieldstreet are in default.  They both were in marine finance, and Yieldstreet did not disclose that they were with the same borrower, increasing my risk of a major loss.  I have little expectation of receiving anything back on either investment.

Anton Matskovski

Apr 09, 2021

Don't fall for their sleek presentation, these guys are either incompetent or crooks or both! Every sector they got into - RE, legal, art finance, marine lending, has multiple deals in default. Investor communication is horrible. They are already under investigation by SEC and FBI, as well as several lawsuits

Tommy Gunn

Feb 15, 2021

Despite my utter enmity for Yieldstreet, I've been lucky to have had good luck with them on the deals I invested in.  2 of 3 termed and my remaining one is in default, but on a plan.  These were all RE deals.

My biggest issue with Yieldstreet is that they are just scummy af.  They way they communicate with investors (if/when they do, that is), the utterly awful way they provide customer service (rude and incompetent) and the fraud...of course the fraud, lol.

Not going to even do my usual 'Pros/Cons' for these guys.  I'm just hopeful my last deal with them returns my principal and then I'm closing the door to Yieldstreet FOREVER!

Avoid these guys at all costs!

Don Wallace

Dec 17, 2020

2 of my 4 Investments with Yieldstreet are in default.
I am in the same Commercial Real Estate Portfolio as others. I also have a large
investment in a Louisiana Oil & Gas that is in Chapter 11 and it is pretty obvious that some fraud was involved as the LTV could not have been as advertised. The investment stopped paying after only 3 months! Ouch!
I also agree with others that communication and transparency and dealing with the defaults are not what I would hope for. Maybe they will prove me wrong, but as of now I regret the day I ever heard of Yieldstreet.

Daniel E

Oct 18, 2019

The underwriting of the RE debt deals is suboptimal.  There are cases of RE debt that are clearly fraud.  Yieldstreet does not provide accurate information about the deals.  Avoid RE offerings in this platform.

S G

Dec 26, 2017

I’m in 2 investments. One investment has been in default for several months.  Another is a litigation financing which is cash flowing poorly- well below projections. I will not be making any futures investments with YS.

April 2021 Update

One investment has a status update of 'past target'. it should be way past target as I invested in 2016. Almost close to getting my full capital paid back as distributions are trickling in. However, I am most frustrated with the follow-up responses I receive from their IR in regards to more details on the investment collateral value. Another investment which has long been in default has dragged on for what seems like forever. Yet to see any real recovery of my capital. It goes without saying I would never put another penny in YieldStreet.

Gary Rebensdorf

Nov 08, 2017

Agreeing with Eric below. By far my favorite too.  I am in a few of the litigation portfolios yielding 12-15%. Seems the money chasing the deals is decreasing the yields.  Also in a few of their RE deals.  I feel like they do a wonderful job of due diligence and have a level of comfort that I don't have with Peer Street, POL & RealtyShares. It feels like you are working with a firm that cares about the deals and their reputation. 

I was most impressed with them when I first tried to get on their platform.  They would not let me on until they received a financial statement and credit check.  They are the only platform that has required that. 

Eric K

Aug 29, 2017

By far my favorite crowdfunding platform because the uniqueness of the asset class.  Litigation finance is not correlated to the economy, the S&P 500, etc. and that at the end of the day, is what makes it an attractive addition to my portfolio.  I'm involved in more than 20 offerings (since about October 2016) and so far so good.  I did web searches, etc. like others but the two factors that convinced me to invest were: 1) Michael Weisz's talk w/the students at the Liebowitz Entrepreneur Program (you can watch on Youtube: https://youtu.be/alEVTF-wnto) 2) Their page on the deals that they did NOT do: https://www.yieldstreet.com/anti-investments 

1) Michael Weisz is extremely bright and savvy, and smart people always figure it out

2) It's quite unique for a platform who would put up a page on deals that did not make it, which shows some good introspection on their part

All in all, quite satisfied with the asset class and the platform.  The only comment I would make is that I hope in the future they will feature more offerings that are not from LawCash and also feature some commercial litigation offerings (most of the offerings currently are personal injury related)

Can't change the ratings (I'm using a Chrome browser) from the default 3.5 stars for some reason, but the ratings I would give are:

Diligence: 5

Platform fees: 3.5

Quality of Deals: 5

Jason Ho

Jul 08, 2017

I like Yieldstreet mostly for its litigation assets, which have been returning 12-13% consistently every year. I've invested in 18 litigation offerings to date, and all are performing as expected and on time.

A typical portfolio comprises of 300-400 cases, where the minimum investment is $5-10k. This allows you to diversify across a large number of outcomes, which reduces the volatility of your returns. The case types are usually motor vehicle accidents, or slip & falls, where the judgements are already well hashed out, and thus the probability of settlement and their amounts can be modeled with some degree of accuracy (versus more complex cases, like commercial litigation, which need to be looked at case-by-case).

Portfolios are typically underwritten so that the total advance amount represents < 10% of the expected net case value, and no single lawsuit represents 5-8% of the total portfolio. Furthermore, only 10% of cases go to trial, with most settling out of court.

Before I started investing in litigation funding, I read "Investing in Justice" by Max Volsky, which I highly recommend if you're looking to understand this asset class better. 

The biggest negative is that YieldStreet doesn't provide due diligence materials for the individual cases in their portfolios. They only give you the general overview and statistics, so you have to trust either LawCash (the originator) or YieldStreet to do the proper underwriting for each case.

Overall, I like YieldStreet's litigation assets for its consistent cash flows, lack of correlation with the public markets, low counterparty risk (the obligers are usually large insurance companies), and built in diversification (< $50 invested in each lawsuit).

Suhail Mohammed

Jul 07, 2017

I am currently invested in 3 of their litigiation finance investments. They fill up lterally within seconds, so you have to be ready at the time they open, submit and hope that you get in before it gets full. Its scary fast. So far, it has been a very good experience and they are performing as expected. I really like these as a way of diversification from real estate and hopng more such non-REI platforms come out.

Bill Scott

Feb 04, 2017

Like on my LendingHome review I agree with James' comments. Their real estate offerings are just "meh".

But I love having something as different in my portfolio as litigation based lending (pre-settlement, post-settlement and lawfirm lending). And for loans having a 13+% return on loans (I am seeing these returns in my account). Since I am looking for litigation based lending I give them a high mark for offering this as an alternative. LawCash is the actual "sponsor" that bundles these loans (usually a few hundred). I definitely would like to see more offerings that are alternative in nature. For this I gave them a slight ding in the quality of deals department.

I really like their dashboard and their investor tools for managing and understanding what is happening with my account (I only have litigation pre-settlement).

Hey Mark, one thing that would be nice is to have a rating dimension on their support. I had a very positive feeling about them since I talked with one of their team members and have an invitation to visit them in their office in NY. However, I have sent a few questions over recently and still waiting for response.

When I invested I expected some emails telling me next steps. I got nothing. However, logging the dashboard was super helpful and I feel it covers most of what I needed to know. However, just an email would have been great.

At this stage I plan on keeping some litigation lending in my portfolio (as long as this lending works out over the course of next few years)

I also feel that the reinvest model would really help. The problem is they are brokering a closed portfolio from LawCash. It seems that if LawCash added their own crowd funding platform they could do something like that?

James Mc Ree

Jan 30, 2017

I like this platform for is lawsuit-related investments.  They seem to be a high returning alternative to the stock market.  My only complaint with them is principle comes back very quickly.  I wish they would re-invest it so my princple would work for the advertised 3 year term.

Their real estate fund investment offerings appear OK, but yield only 9% for a relatively narrow spread of investments in the fund.  Investors can get 9+% returns in single-property investments relatively easily and a fund that only invests in a few holdings isn't that diversified.

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Yieldstreet Reviews & Ratings Yieldstreet Reviews & Ratings
Rated 1.9/5 based on 28 customer reviews

To see discussions  from over 1000 accredited investors as they share their experience with Yieldstreet, join the 506 Investor Group. Get access and special terms to other legal financing funds.

YieldStreet’s technology connects you to asset-based opportunities presented by best-in-class originators. And it's as easy as buying stocks.

YieldStreet investments are debt based alternative investments. YieldStreet Originators take out a loan for a project or need that is collateralized by an underlying asset the originator has, such as a real estate property or legal settlement.

YieldStreet’s offerings currently concentrate in three primary alternative asset classes: real estate, litigation finance and commercial finance. You can learn more about each of our asset classes on YieldStreet University. YieldStreet seeks investment opportunities that provide individuals with low correlation to the broader stock market, and target annual yields between 8-20%.

As originators make principal and interest payments during the term of their loan, distributions are paid out directly to investors in the offering.

All YieldStreet offerings are asset-based, meaning your investment is backed by strong collateral such as vehicles or real estate. This collateral acts like insurance in the rare case a borrower defaults.

The YieldStreet team does an initial review of the opportunity according to the five criteria set in its Investment Philosophy:

Asset-based with strong collateral

Low market correlation

Established asset managers

Short duration (1-3 years)

Attractive yield (8-20% annual target returns)

YieldStreet At A Glance

Here’s the quick and dirty part of our YieldStreet review, separated into easy-to-read categories so that you can tell, at a glance, whether a YieldStreet investment is good for you or not. As always, you’ll need to do your own due diligence in identifying whether a specific investment offered by YieldStreet is an appropriate choice for you. However, this due diligence starts right here with our review.

 

Minimum Investment Levels: 

Our YieldStreet review can review that the minimum investment for a typical offering is usually around $10,000. However, this isn’t standard but instead an average - minimums can vary by offer. Munimums in the past have been set anywhere between $60,000 at the highest and $5,000 at the lowest; the YieldStreet Prism Fund, for example, begins at $5,000. 

Types of Investments:

Yieldstreet offers a wide variety of investment opportunities. This includes real estate investment, marine finance, art, commercial loans, and litigation All of these investment offerings are featured on the YieldStreet website complete with necessary details including the total size of the offering, the minimum and maximum investment levels, the duration of the investment, and how much annual return is expected, making it easy for prospective investors to do their due diligence. Yieldstreet also goes into detail why the company chose the investment as well as the expenses such as management fees, the risks of these investments, its risk mitigation strategies, and what the time schedule is likely to be for repayment. 

Investments Based on Underlying Assets:  

Every Yieldstreet offering is backed by an underlying asset. This could be real estate for real estate deals, marine vessels for marine finance, or a legal settlement, which gives the company a multitude of ways to potentially recover defaulted loans. Yet there’s still no guarantee that YieldStreet investors will get a return on their investment;all investing involves risk, after all, and this includes the possible loss of your principal investment. LIke the old adage goes, you have to spend money to make money!

Fees:

Yieldstreet Management does charge annual management fees. This management fee is, on average, between 1% to 2.5%. In addition to these fees, Yieldstreet sometimes charges originators listing fees as well. This is all dependent on the type of investment; some carry flat annual fees that begin at $100 to $150 in the short term for the first 12 months and then drop to $30 to $70 for subsequent years. The platform deducts these fees from your initial interest payments, and these fees are clearly delineated on the pages for each individual offering on the platform. 

Accredited Investor Exclusivity:

Like many investment platforms, YieldStreet reserves most of its investment deals for accredited investors only. According to the Securities and Exchange Commission, accredited investors must have at least $1 million in net worth in addition to the value of your primary residence. Alternatively, you must have made at least $200,000 over the past two years (or $300,000 if they’re married). This means that only accredited investor activity is summarily high on this platform

 Some Non-Accredited Investor Support:

While most of the investor activity for YieldStreet is relegated to accredited investors, the platform has launched a new fixed-income portfolio perfect for those with alternative assets. The Prism Fund is open to non-accredited investment, offering five asset classes: corporate preferred bonds, real estate, private business credit, commercial, and legal investment. The offering pays quarterly and has an annual income rate of 7%, according to the company. Annual fees are 1.5% for investors. The liquidation date for the fund is set at March 2024, but fund asset liquidation may take up to an additional 12 months after that for you to receive compensation. 

Self-directed IRA option:  

For anyone looking for investing through self-directed IRA options, YieldStreet has opportunities for you. The company uses IRA Services as a third party custodian broker; investing can be made with a trust or an LLC. If you have a solo 401(k) that’s configured as a trust or LLC, you can use these assets as well.

Investment liquidity:

Committing to YieldStreet means that the platform will manage your investing for the duration of the offering. This can also extend beyond the planned duration when necessary. What this means for an investor is that once you invest your money, you’ve now committed to the full term of the platform’s investment. The one notable difference is that the Prism Fund does allow personal investing to be redeemed in June of 2021. 

 Investment availability: 

Investing through the platform is no guarantee of availability. Each investing opportunity is only available for a limited time, which means one investor may get in under the wire while another may be locked out; investing in very much a first-come, first-served situation. Investment returns are, therefore, measured in years, not months. When it comes to pros and cons, this may be one of the biggest drawbacks if you want to invest in YieldStreet.

The Details

Our Yieldstreet review reveals the inner workings of this opportunity like none other, and for good reason: if you choose to invest in this opportunity, it’s crucial that you understand the differences between this platform and the majority of others on the market. Plenty of crowdfunded real estate platforms let you purchase a share in a commercial real estate. This is, after all, the standard operating procedure for the lion’s share of these types of crowdfunding investment opportunities. Yieldstreet, however, takes a different approach: it’s an alternative investment platform that makes debt investments. In summary, Yieldstreet crowdfunds the debt incurred to finance both real estate investments and other borrower payment dependent investments. This opens up dozens of opportunities that you simply wouldn’t be able to access with a more traditional crowdfunding approach.

Yieldstreet began in 2015 with its first offering, a litigation finance investment that pairs investors with plaintiffs in need of cash to cover expenses prior to the arrival of an expected lawsuit settlement. Since then, YieldStreet has branched out into personal finance, residential property, commercial lending, fine art purchases, and even oil tanker loan purchasing - wherever there’s the possibility for profit, YieldStreet has its eye on it. Investments in these loans provide interest payments and return of principal investment over their lifetime, though investing in such deals do always carry a risk of default if the borrower cannot repay. This is a different type of risk than your typical investment in real estate, for example; while there’s a risk that a property will not turn a profit after sale, an alternative investment that ends up in default can be harder to recover.

Due to the higher level of risk (and commensurate reward) associated with these alternative investments, most YieldStreet deals are reserved for accredited investors with the deep pockets to handle larger investment sizes. However, the company has since launched the Prism Fund in August of 2020, which is specifically open to nonaccredited investors that can meet the $5,000 minimum investment requirement. This helps to democratize access to YieldStreet somewhat, though this $5000 minimum may still be high for novices or others who simply do not have the necessary assets to invest.

At the same time, this hasn’t necessarily slowed down the growth of this unique investment opportunity. In fact, according to our due diligence, the YieldStreet wallet contains more than $1.5 billion in investment activity as of October 2020. The 2020 Inc. 5000, which lists the fastest-growing privately held companies in the US, ranked Yieldstreet as 46th.

Deciding if YieldStreet is Right For You

Our YieldStreet review of its short term investments and long term cons, pros, and other issues, even with advertiser disclosure, must be clear: the company offers individuals the opportunity to invest in things that most individuals usually would not. Investments in private structured credit deals are usually reserved for institutional investors and hedge funds, and are very rarely open for a private individual to invest in. This makes YieldStreet offerings unique and, if you’re looking for opportunities for such investments, an excellent choice indeed.  

However, if your interest lies in more accessible investment opportunities or ones with slightly less risk, YieldStreet might not be the best choice for you. Being ideal for experienced investment means, necessarily, that novice investors are likely to find YieldStreet a poor fit. With the requirement that most investors be accredited save for the single Prism offering, and with a minimum of $5000 on that fund investment, YieldStreet is decidedly not a good bet if you’re looking to simply dip your toes into this type of investment activity. Instead, it’s much more geared towards already successful, well-heeled investor activity. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course - there are simply better choices out there for novices. Once you’ve got your sea legs, YieldStreet has much to offer indeed - and even more so for accredited investment activity.

As always, our Yieldstreet review wouldn’t be complete unless we specified the general dangers of investing. Always conduct due diligence in researching investments and never put all your eggs in one basket and keep the 10% rule of thumb in mind: never invest more than one tenth of your portfolio in the kinds of alternative investments that YieldStreet offers. Instead, keep the majority of your investments on mutual funds or index funds, as these will give you a diversified and broad exposure to the stock market.